Friday, February 27, 2009

Honoring Native American history and culture on coinage


Were you aware that the U.S.Mint is releasing beautiful dollar coins into circulation, celebrating the history and culture of Native Americans? Sacagawea adorns the front and various themes will be depicted on the back.

Chances are, you had no idea. I know I didn't, not until I stumbled upon a website about it just the other day. I've had enough trouble keeping up with the Presidential Dollar Coins, which are barely available.

The U.S. Mint has about the worst, most lack-luster public relations operation that I have ever seen. When was the last time you saw a commercial about these beautiful new coins? Most banks barely carry them -- and good luck finding them anywhere else or in your change.

Using dollar coins saves the government money over the far more fragile paper bills. But apparently the government doesn't care enough to do much of anything about it.

3 comments:

troutbirder said...

Too bad about the mint. Of course, they have been there before. Anyone who has ever read The Journal of Lewis & Clark, knows Sacajawea save the explorers from disaster more than once.

Eastcoastdweller said...

Troutbirder:

One of the greatest memories of my late journalism career was to stand upon the lawn at Monticello on a frigid February morning when the official commemoration of Lewis and Clark kicked off a few years ago ...

Their journey, of course, inspires mixed emotions.

It opened up the West for massive exploitation. But if not by the Americans, the region would have been opened up by someone eventually.

The story of York, the black slave who accompanied the group, has a bitter ending ... an equal, voting partner on the journey, a mere slave again upon his return ...

The survival of these brave explorers in a "wild land of savages" is noted as quite remarkable -- but rarely is it noted that if the savages had truly been such, this little group would never made it through the thousands of miles of their territory alive.

kat said...

so much rich history to celebrate and admire

and so much history to regret and feel pain about...

such is the story of peoples everywhere!

Have you been by my posting about the Indian Museum yet?

I must get the coins!
I always loved the Buffalo nickel... and coins in general... but early on I was more of a stamp collector... though I didn't keep it up...